Connect with us

Health

Greg Bishop, Attorney of Park City, Discusses Intermittent Fasting During Retirement

mm

Published

on

Intermittent fasting – currently in vogue in many diet and health circles – describes different approaches to fasting. As the term implies, intermittent fasting refers to periodically abstaining from food and drink (although water and non-caloric drinks are acceptable). There are several different categories of intermittent fasting, but the three most common are (1) time-restricted feeding, (2) alternate-day fasting, and (3) periodic fasting.

Time-restricted feeding refers to eating only within a prescribed block of time each day. For example, one common approach is the 16:8 diet, where you fast continuously for 16 hours and then eat only during an 8-hour block of time (such as between 11:00 AM and 7:00 PM). The frequency of eating during that block of time – for example, 2 big meals versus 3 smaller meals with snacks – is largely a matter of personal preference.

Alternate-day fasting involves rotating between “fast days” and “feast days.” Under this method, a “fast day” can be thought of either as strict fasting (no food and only non-caloric drinks) or as limited to 25% of your normal daily caloric intake. A “feast day,” on the other hand, refers to a regular day of eating your normal caloric intake (in other words, the fast day does not offset going calorie crazy on the feast day).

Finally, periodic fasting is similar to alternate-day fasting in that it can refer to any occasional fasting for 24 or more consecutive hours, followed by a normal eating period. The 5:2 diet is an example of a common periodic fasting diet – eating five days each week and fasting on two non-consecutive days.

What’s the Point of Intermittent Fasting?

Attorney Greg Bishop, located in Park City, Utah, explains that the primary purposes of intermittent fasting are to lose weight and improve health. He notes that a December 2019 article published in the New England Journal of Medicine concludes that studies and clinical trials have demonstrated that intermittent fasting:

  • Is as effective for weight loss as standard diets (according to 6 short-term studies involving overweight or obese adults);
  • Promotes fat loss while maintaining muscle mass in those involved in resistance training;
  • Reduces the health risks associated with obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers and neurologic disorders;
  • Improves multiple indicators of cardiovascular health, including blood pressure, resting heart rate, HDL and LDL cholesterol levels, and insulin resistance;
  • Increases neuronal stress resistance through multiple mechanisms, including bolstering antioxidant defenses and DNA repair;
  • Suppresses inflammation, which can be beneficial in treating rheumatoid arthritis; and
  • Increases verbal memory, executive function, global cognition and working memory.

Notwithstanding the growing evidence from clinical studies regarding the health benefits of intermittent fasting, there is still much that we do not know. For example, most of the clinical studies were short-term, conducted over a matter of months. Thus, the long-term impacts of intermittent fasting are not yet known. Similarly, most of the study participants were overweight young- and middle-aged adults. It remains to be seen whether the benefits demonstrated in these short-term trials of young- and middle-aged adults also apply to older adults over the long term.

In addition, even if the benefits were conclusively established, it will likely take time for people so ingrained in a culture of eating three meals per day (plus snacks) to make the transition to some form of intermittent fasting. Moreover, some may find fasting difficult because of early symptoms of hunger, irritability and reduced ability to concentrate (which should subside within a month).

About Greg Bishop, Attorney | Greg Bishop is a Park City, Utah-based attorney with extensive experience in litigation, corporate work, M&A, licensing, IPO preparation, and HR, as well as corporate and board governance. Personally, he is passionate about helping others, including spending seven years working closely with the largest organization helping the homeless in Washington, D.C. In his free time, he enjoys the outdoors, mountain biking and traveling, as well as helping others achieve personal and professional success.

Michelle has been a part of the journey ever since Bigtime Daily started. As a strong learner and passionate writer, she contributes her editing skills for the news agency. She also jots down intellectual pieces from categories such as science and health.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Health

Tap Into The Healthy Power of Citrus Fruits This Summer

mm

Published

on

June is Peak Season for Lemons, Limes, and Oranges 

June has finally arrived and with it, the bounty of seasonal summer citrus fruits. With lemons, limes and oranges at peak season, it’s time to embrace this superfood trio to keep you happy, healthy, and hydrated all summer long. Whether it’s on your plate, in a smoothie, or in your water bottle, citrus fruits have long been hailed as nature’s power produce, providing our bodies with a whole host of nutrients without a lot of calories.

CITRUS FRUITS HEALTH BENEFITS

Lemons contain nutrients that can help support your cardiovascular health and protect against kidney stones and amenia. Additionally, lemons are high in Vitamin C, fiber and naturally beneficial plant compounds which can help lower cholesterol.

Limes are rich in Vitamin C as well, and help the immune system fight infections by attacking bacteria and viruses. They are acidic, which helps saliva break down food and stimulate good digestion.

Also boasting a high Vitamin C content , oranges contain magnesium and vitamin B6, which can help keep blood pressure under control. Additionally, one orange is equal to about 4 ounces of water, so they are also an excellent source for hydration. 

Consuming these summer citrus fruits is a great way to neutralize your body’s free radicals, which can be damaging molecules caused by exposure to chemicals, UV rays and other environmental stressors.  

STAY HEALTHY AND HYDRATED

As temperatures begin to soar from June onwards, it is essential to keep hydrated during the summer months. Proper hydration helps regulate body temperature, keeps the blood flowing evenly, supports brain function, lubricates the joints and supports smooth digestion. 

Don’t wait until you feel thirsty to have a drink. If you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated! Dehydration can affect people of all ages and fitness levels. One of the simplest ways to check your hydration levels is with a hydration calendar, suited to your gender, age, weight and activity level. 

If drinking water has become a bore, kick your beverage up a notch with clean and healthy water flavor enhancers like True Lemon or True Lime crystallized wedge replacements. Made from real lemon and lime juice and oils and no sugar or artificial flavors, colors or preservatives. Nothing but real citrus goodness.

Or combine the refreshment of lemons, limes and oranges with True Lemon Triple Citrus lemonade for a new twist on the classic summer lemonade. Made with only simple, clean Non GMO ingredients, each single serving added to your water bottle is only 10 calories and contains no artificial sweeteners or ingredients whose names you can’t pronounce. An easy and delicious way to stay hydrated anytime or anywhere.

Continue Reading

Trending