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From Small Town to Entertainment Capital of the World – Nara Ford

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How Nara Ford went from a tiny beach town to a widely renowned model and businesswoman living her dream life in Las Vegas

Everyone knows that the modeling industry is one of the toughest to break into. Social media is saturated with would-be models and influencers. So how did a small-town girl from Washington become a (practically) overnight success in such a dog-eat-dog business? Read on to get acquainted with Nara Ford, a tough ex-airman in the U.S. Airforce, who was discovered by being labeled a “Military Hottie” while on active duty in Mississippi.

Behind every beautiful aspiring model, there are hundreds in line hoping to be discovered. Nara Ford realized this truth early on when she began gaining traction in the world of modeling after being featured on several platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and The Chive, for her incredible figure. Nara got a taste of success after her first paid gig (to the tune of $5,000) and was bitten by the entrepreneurial bug. Rather than resting on her laurels, as they say, Nara developed a sharp business plan that has helped her become not only a successful model but a keen businesswoman who helps others, hoping to realize their dreams.

Nara was born and raised in the little beach town of Ocean Shores, Washington. After being led to serve her country, Nara enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. When she realized modeling was a real possibility for a future career, she got serious about learning all she could about the industry. When the Air Force moved her to Las Vegas, she looked at it as a golden opportunity to stretch her legs as a bonafide model, but that is not all. As the modeling took shape, not everyone was thrilled. There was controversy over racy photographs published while an active-duty airman, a blip that did not deter the ambitious Nara. She continued to build her modeling portfolio, being featured in domestic and international magazine publications. More than a pretty face, Nara began constructing a business plan not only to get ahead but bring others along with her.

Nara hosts networking events to brand herself but is also eager to share the knowledge she has amassed in the industry. She hosts engagement groups and has created a unique formula to help new influencers earn six figures annually, as she does. Nara is now within the top 1% of a pool of over 450,000 content creators and strives to help other women do the same. Nara is assembling a team of the hottest up-and-coming girls from small towns who also strive for unique branding and social media success. The idea was born when Nara recognized that many other women share the same ambition as her. As a result, she created ways to help women learn the art of embracing their bodies, not becoming fixated on what others think, and reaching their career goals, however big or small.   

Nara is building an empire more than a career. Her brand encompasses not only modeling but running a lucrative website for four years before Only Fans. Nara participates in live streaming, PPV, and messaging, rarely turning down a fan’s request, not even the “off” ones she sometimes receives. She has grown her business while narrowing in on her clientele’s specific needs, perfecting her marketing skills, and monetizing her Instagram following, resulting in over $500,000 in her first year!

Setbacks are common, but thankfully, Nara says, she has not encountered many of them so far in her journey. “One of the keys is to not worry too much about things I cannot control. I focus on myself, try to be the best I can be, and remember that it’s all about the fans.” Nara says she makes it a point to measure herself by her past achievements. To stay focused, healthy, and ready for the demands of her schedule, Nara meditates, works out, and maintains a positive attitude. Self-love and respect are critical keys to her success.   

Most entrepreneurs understand the importance of diversifying one’s income streams. Nara is no different. She has found ways to do this every chance she gets. After purchasing and renovating her Las Vegas dream home, Nara rents part of the space for other creators to shoot their content. It is not only a way to earn extra money but also add value to her clients. Fans can expect a lot more from Nara in the future. With tireless energy and willingness to learn and produce exciting content, this model-turned-mogul is quickly making a name for herself. “There is plenty more to come! I am always trying to figure out what my fans want and make that happen in new and entertaining ways.”

Learn more about Nara by following her on Instagram at @thenaraford, Twitter at nara_ford, and on her website at www.naraford.com.

The idea of Bigtime Daily landed this engineer cum journalist from a multi-national company to the digital avenue. Matthew brought life to this idea and rendered all that was necessary to create an interactive and attractive platform for the readers. Apart from managing the platform, he also contributes his expertise in business niche.

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Lifestyle

Sick of Always Being the Sidekick: Actress Mahima Saigal hopes to create work that uproots stereotypes and reclaims the Hero’s Journey for people of color.

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  1. Why did you decide to pursue acting and how did you know that New York City was where you wanted to be?

To be completely honest with you, I had zero clue what my “thing” was when I was in an all girls Catholic school in Delhi. Everyone around me was either winning extempore rounds, school debates or getting the lead role in our annual Christmas play without auditioning. I clearly wasn’t the most academically gifted student and in a class that had over 175 girls in it, I wasn’t the most conspicuous as well. I believe it was this fear of invisibility, of being excluded that led me to go all in for this acting opportunity where I had to play the role of a tortured kid in a street play. At that time my resume was just limited to my height which, I am pleased to inform, remains intact at 4’11. I think that’s what got me the role!That play struck a chord deep within. Whether it was the energy of doing live theatre or seeing some semblance of respect in my teachers’ eyes- I don’t know, but I wanted more of it. While the experience of acting in school helped me improve my confidence and surprisingly, my grades as well, I was still insecure about my choice to pursue acting professionally. In university, I went ahead with a safe option of pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in History and refused to join the Drama Society. Primarily because I didn’t know if I could do it. So what did I do to face this fear? I moved to a whole new continent without even knowing why. Perhaps it was my unmitigated love for (censored) Sex and the City or the need to have bagels as my staple breakfast diet. Who knows? But what I did know was that I needed a chance to experiment with my craft, to find out if I could really do it, and to quote Jay-Z ``If you make it here you can make it anywhere” Right? It’s funny that my fear of invisibility which pushed me towards acting, drew me to a city where being visible is one of the toughest things to accomplish.

  1. What lessons have you learnt thus far as an artist on American soil? And how do they show up in your work?

One must always be true to their own identity and embrace it rather than run from it. While the odds may be stacked up against you, it is more empowering to stick with what you know, than to submerge yourself into what “they” want. Real talk, “they” truly don’t care about you so you might as well go ahead and do what you love and add some masala to it while you’re at it. This lesson holds not just for my work but for my personal life as well. So many times I’ve been asked to repeat myself because people had issues with my accent. I don’t say issues “understanding” my accent but just issues with it. It seems there is a very specific cadence of tone or voice that is deemed acceptable or worthy of response when it comes to the English language in America. I would love my work to challenge that, to show that people who sound like me, who mix English with their mother tongue are capable of telling narratives that are gripping, valid and worthy of viewership.

  1. How do you hope that your presence on the stage or on the screen, even behind the scenes as a writer, producer,  will inspire young creators who are also coming in trying to engage in the same process as you?

A network, that I shouldn’t name (yet), was looking for a South Asian actress with an accent obviously, and they needed them to speak in one of the South Asian languages. I did get the chance to tape myself and improvise in my native tongue. However, on the day of the submission I was told that the network  will not be accepting someone on a work visa. This is the fifth time this has happened to me. While all this is great fodder for my grand ‘thank you’ speech that I would love to make one day, it has also led to this growing confusion that irks me like that one ankle sock that refuses to co-exist with your latest bootie. Confusion because I feel I am in this state of constant unknowing when it comes to TV. I don’t genuinely know whether or not I’m good at it because I’m never allowed to present my work in front of the people who are the gatekeepers of it. But what I do know is that stopping isn’t an option for me. And this isn’t some you can do it motivational spiel that various self proclaimed “gurus”  keep spewing about. I genuinely think that there is a way to pierce this unnecessary barricade that impedes non- citizen artists from presenting their work forward and I truly want to be a part of that movement so that people who look like me or will be in my position five years from now are not as massively confused as I am today.

  1. Do you plan on continuing with production? Is being a producer what’s bringing you the most fulfillment now?

I accepted the role of a producer rather unwillingly as most of the projects that came my way were through my acting network. I deeply appreciated that my network took note of my resourcefulness, but it also hurt that they forgot to take note of the fact that I am an actor first. While these projects were not large scale it still bothered me to watch the paucity of diversity in each one of them. That’s when I decided that if I am to take on the arduous task of being a producer then I better invest and uplift stories that were true to what I knew and understood to be the POC experience in America. I want to ensure that these stories were told right. Keeping that as my throughline, I can most definitely say that producing stories that align with my values and vision has definitely proven to be more fulfilling than I had imagined.

  1. COVID-19 was obviously challenging for the entire world, the entertainment industry included. What were the major takeaways, positive or negative, from that experience?

It’s hard to see Covid-19 under a positive light given what is going on in the global south, especially in my country, India. To see one part of my world  move on at warp speed, effortlessly forgetting the collective trauma and the ache we all felt in the year 2020. While the other part struggles non-stop to obtain even the most basic of medical supplies. It’s one of the toughest contradictions I have to live with. But, it’s also made me more wary of this unacknowledged global divide and how unnerving it can be for someone who has their toes dipped in such extremely different worlds. However, my mother says, one must always look at the bright side. I try with all my might to do so, especially with something as oppressive as Covid. So, no matter how unforgiving it was (still is), Covid did bring to light some of the most heroic stories of our times. The indefatigable spirit of the health care and the essential workers, the acumen of the common people of India who used social media to raise funds for oxygen tanks and supplies when the government abandoned them, the young men and women who risked their lives to donate blood to save the elderly and finally the NGOs that worked relentlessly to provide aid to the smallest of villages.  All these stories show us that some heroes really do exist beyond the cinematic universe of  Marveland they don’t necessarily wear capes or need to have a specific kind of accent or look to be deemed worthy of the Hero’s Journey.

Photographer: 

NICK WHEELEHON PHOTOGRAPHY

IG: @wheelehonphotography

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