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Shock Waves can Deform a Material Up to its Atomic Level

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Scientists from Materials Structure Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology have captured the deformation effect of shock waves on the material when they used x-rays diffraction. The effect shows how shock waves deform material at the atomic level. Creativity and manipulation in the structure of a material to know about their properties was the foundation of the research. The interaction between the materials takes place with the exchange of forces. So now it would be easy to predict any material’s ability to withstand force and how it would impact the central body of the structure.

The deformation force caused by the rays on the material was actually a shock wave that had displaced the atoms of the material. If the external force is not too great, then the internal force occurred due to atoms can block the external force to retain the natural state of the material or structure. In the case the external force is beyond the limit, force may result in permanent damage and deformation on the material or structure, and then structural failure analysis experts would be needed to make a report on the material being deformed.

The x-ray diffraction came to the rescue at the unit cells of the material. The unit cell is the smallest repeating three-dimensional atomic structure that reflects the symmetry of the crystal. By studying the displacement developed due to crystal deformation, the material was observed. When x-rays were directed towards the atom, it gets absorbed and they re-emit again in the form of shock way by the atom present in the crystal.

Michelle has been a part of the journey ever since Bigtime Daily started. As a strong learner and passionate writer, she contributes her editing skills for the news agency. She also jots down intellectual pieces from categories such as science and health.

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Science

30 Life Science Firms Attended Medilink EM innovation Event

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Over 200 representatives from 30 science multinational firms came together to celebrate the Medilink East Midlands (EM) Innovation Day. Medilink East Midlands is a business support organization which supports companies looking to operate or move into the life science sector in the East Midlands. It also provides membership to eligible companies in its area. Four members of Medilink EM were also present on the innovation day.

There were many guest speakers present in this years’ innovation day. Sue Nelson, one of the speakers, is an award-winning science journalist and a former science and environment correspondent for BBC TV news. She writes publications and is the author for Wally Funk’s Race for Space. Professor Chas Bountra was also present in the event as a guest speaker. He is Pro-Vice-Chancellor for innovation at the University of Oxford, Professor of Translational Medicine in the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, and Chief Scientific Officer for the Structural Genomics Consortium.

There were more than twelve guest speakers present in the event. All of them covered a wide variety of science topics in their speeches. The event was a good opportunity for Innovation day delegates to meet more than 30 life science companies, which were exhibiting at the event. Similar to this is another company that offers networking events in Toronto with startuphere, providing an evening of great conversation, lots of networking and new opportunities.

Medilink EM CEO Darren Clark launched the Medilink EM annual report for 2018/19 and delegates were invited to attend the Medilink EM summer networking that took place after the event in the evening. As part of this, a talk was held about the Growing Rehabilitation Industries Project between the Universities of Loughborough, Leicester and Nottingham Trent. Medilink EM is supporting this project as a key partner.

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