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How Does the Quality Sleep Affect Your Mental Wellbeing

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As you might have noticed, poor quality sleep has immediate adverse effects after pulling an all-nighter or when someone wakes you up before your alarm goes off. However, besides feeling groggy and out of it, did you know that not sleeping well can cause or exacerbate mental health issues? 

Taking care of your mental health should be a priority. Mental health being a priority is why you have to ensure your sleep quality doesn’t get compromised. And for that, one of the best things is the Cake Delta 8 Disposable. Cake is a well-known brand, and its Delta 8 disposables are safe, last for hours and come at an attractive price.

Depression

For a long time, depression was known to be what causes you not to get enough sleep, but recent studies show that sleep deprivation can lead to depression. For example, a meta-analysis from 2011 with data from 21 studies found that your chances of getting depression double if you have insomnia.

Suffering from chronic sleep deprivation, which means getting poor quality sleep over long periods, is now known for changing a chemical called serotonin in your brain. The serotonin in your brain is the chemical responsible for keeping you happier when it’s at normal levels. Should these levels drop, you risk getting depression. 

ADHD

If you’ve had ADHD since childhood, whether or not you were diagnosed with it, you might find it harder to fall asleep when you grow older. Unfortunately, the opposite is also true, and research has shown that it’s possible to develop ADHD later if your sleep patterns are regularly disturbed over the years.

Researchers found through sleep restriction experiments that getting poor sleep can worsen ADHD symptoms. That can cause you to get more impulsive, over-active, and inattentive than usual. Additionally, a study that involved children with ADHD showed a decline in the intensity of symptoms after the kids’ sleep patterns got restored to normal levels.

Anxiety

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, you need to get a minimum of seven hours of sleep every day to avoid mental health issues like anxiety. Dr. Julia Kogan, a sleep and stress psychology specialist, says your body produces higher cortisol levels when you’re getting enough sleep.

Cortisol is a chemical that’s usually connected with stress as it’s responsible for worsening digestive problems and headaches to make you feel exhausted or anxious. In addition, sleep deprivation intensifies activity in the regions of your brain correlated to anxiety, as stated in a 2013 study in The Journal of Neuroscience.

PTSD

A 2019 meta-analysis and systematic review said that your chances of developing an anxiety disorder like PTSD multiply by three if you have insomnia. Other studies saw people who experience sleep disruptions being at risk of getting PTSD more quickly than people who sleep healthily. Losing out on REM sleep was the prominent factor in increasing this risk.

REM sleep and other stages of sleep are crucial in helping you understand that the stimuli you experience in an unpleasant setting can be harmless. The Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging journal has a study that showed how losing sleep hampers the brain’s function that makes you forget bad memories.

Psychosis

Researchers say if you lie awake in bed often instead of sleeping, the longer you do this, the higher your chances of losing a sense of reality rise. Some of the symptoms you must look out for before the situation worsens include intensifying hallucinations and hazy or racing thoughts. 

Psychosis symptoms are now understood to amplify the longer you stay awake and usually start with simple sensory misjudgments. The good news is that if you find yourself with psychosis symptoms due to not sleeping enough, returning your sleep patterns to healthy levels can cure these.

Bipolar disorder 

A study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry in September 2017 found that sleep deprivation can trigger manic episodes in people with bipolar disorder. Additionally, when you’re experiencing a manic episode, you could feel like you don’t need sleep as you’ll feel extraordinarily energized or alert. 

A study in the Translational Psychiatry journal that singled out healthy people found a link between poor sleep and bipolar disorder risk. While this study doesn’t mean you’ll get bipolar disorder by not sleeping enough, it does give us enough reason to want to prevent that possibility. 

Conclusion

You can avoid developing or making many mental health conditions worse by simply spending more time asleep. However, just sleeping may not always be easy. So look for ways to curb abnormal sleeping patterns and contact your doctor should you think you have a sleep disorder.

Michelle has been a part of the journey ever since Bigtime Daily started. As a strong learner and passionate writer, she contributes her editing skills for the news agency. She also jots down intellectual pieces from categories such as science and health.

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Lifestyle

Sara Zaimi Vies for Miss NJ Crown

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The Miss NJ competition seeks a leader, a role model who inspires with both brains and heart. Enter Sara Zaimi, a trailblazing pharmacist with a Doctorate (PharmD) whose passion for women’s health and community empowerment burns brightly.

A brush with mortality at a young age – chest pain and a concerning blood test – ignited a fire in Sara. Witnessing the unwavering spirit of women battling cancer in the oncology ward solidified her desire to make a difference. It was her mother’s unwavering support, the way she held her hand through fear and doubt, that propelled Sara to answer that call. Overcoming self-doubt and depression, she embarked on a remarkable academic journey, graduating with her PharmD at the prestigious Rutgers University at the early age of 23, placing her among the top 10% of her class.

As a first-generation Algerian American, she’s a testament to the power of hard work and perseverance. Her academic achievements, including valedictorian honors and consistent Dean’s List placements, stand as a testament. This translates further into her successful business, where she champions women’s health awareness. Her impact extends far beyond the pharmacy walls. Sara dedicates her time to NJ Sisterhood, empowering young women and inner-city communities. Her fluency in Spanish further highlights her commitment to inclusivity and understanding.

Driven by personal experience and empathy, Sara aims to leverage the Miss NJ platform to tackle critical women’s health issues. From early detection of breast cancer to advocating for increased resources, she seeks to empower women to take charge of their health. Her work with NJ Sisterhood complements this mission, focusing on projects that empower women and address their specific needs. Her advocacy includes promoting 3D areola tattooing for breast cancer survivors, a powerful example of how science and art can converge in the healing process.

Sara’s strength lies in the synergy of her diverse experiences. Her business acumen and her work with NJ Sisterhood position her to champion women’s health and community well-being on a grander stage. She envisions using the Miss NJ platform to create tangible change, increasing resources for those affected by breast cancer and other women’s health issues.

The demands of a successful business, active volunteer work with NJ Sisterhood, and the rigorous training for the Miss NJ competition require exceptional time management skills. Sara thrives under pressure, meticulously juggling her commitments without compromising on quality.

Her multifaceted personality, unwavering commitment to women’s health, and passion for community empowerment make her a strong contender for Miss NJ. She embodies the true spirit of the competition: a woman who is not just beautiful, but a force for good, inspiring young women to reach for their dreams and embrace their unique talents.

Follow Sara’s journey and learn more about her mission on Instagram: @pharminked_laser and @njsisterhood. Let’s cheer her on as she vies for the Miss NJ crown!

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