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Meat Meets Meet: How I Built A Community Of Female Bodybuilders Around A Vegan Diet

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The right support can make or break a new diet or workout regime. This is why a strong sense of community and belonging makes a world of difference when it comes to reaching fitness goals. 

The founder of The Sculpted Vegan, Kim Constable, is keenly aware of the benefits of making people feel valued and supported on their journey to healthier and stronger bodies. In fact, she has based her entire multi-million dollar business on the idea of building a community of like-minded people and putting her clients before profits.

“From the outset, I focused on supporting and serving my people rather than on finding more customers. This wasn’t a strategy, it’s just who I am,” Constable says. “When someone tries something new, they are vulnerable. And when you are there for them every step of the way, loving them deeply and upholding them when they can’t uphold themselves, something magical happens. They realize that you aren’t just there to take their money. They realize that you truly care.”  

Bulking up vegan

Constable founded The Sculpted Vegan to help women shape their bodies without consuming animal products. She also wanted to debunk the misconception that you cannot build muscle without eating meat and dairy. And to prove that a tailored diet of high-protein foods such as tofu, legumes, and quinoa can be a game-changer when it comes to achieving muscle gain. 

“I was a vegetarian for 16 years and a vegan for one when I decided to start sculpting my body. My coach had no experience training vegans and told me that he wouldn’t be able to help with my nutrition plan. This is when I decided to do my own research and was startled that there was practically zero information out there to help me,” says the Belfast-based mom of four. 

Realizing that she would have to start from scratch, Constable set out to devise her own vegan nutrition regime. And her painstaking research paid off. Constable gradually started to see what she refers to as her loose skin fill up with muscle. At the age of 37, she even won a bodybuilding bikini competition and six more titles in the following two years. 

It took Constable four years to get her figure exactly to where she wanted it. Throughout this time, her nutritional plan continued to evolve. She also gradually started to realize that there were many vegan women out there in the same situation she was in four years before. “If I was searching for information that wasn’t there, there must have been many others doing the same,” she says.

Helping others achieve results 

Constable used her experience in health, wellness, business, and marketing to start The Sculpted Vegan from her kitchen table. At the time, she had limited financial backing and virtually no social media following. Nevertheless, Constable’s first bodybuilding program for women, the 18-month Sculpt and Shred, was a roaring success, generating $52,000 right after launch. 

Since founding the Sculpted Vegan, Constable has masterminded 10 other online fitness programs – all designed to get women ripped without consuming animal products. Today some of Constable’s most popular programs include the 1-week, 4-week, and 12-week shreds, and the 8-week butt camp. There is also the Jailhouse Shred that helps women build muscles using their own body weight.

The results have been nothing short of extraordinary. Constable’s bodybuilding business ended up making $8 million in the first three years of operation, and today generates $400,000 in revenue each month. She also has over 450,000 followers on Instagram and Facebook and hosts an iTunes podcast that tackles a range of taboo topics with a monthly audience of 200,000. 

Tailored support

Realizing that some need more hands-on support than others when it comes to reaching fitness goals, Constable also offers one-on-one coaching sessions with top bodybuilding and nutrition coaches. Her other business, The Million Dollar Mentor, in turn, trains others how to create and manage their own successful brands. “I really love coaching. I love empowering women to be successful. After all, if I can do it, anyone can,” she says.

This year will also see Constable launch The Sculpted Vegan app, which will enable members to find both her programs and a community of like-minded women. “The custom-built app will be a one-stop-shop for buying and following my program, coaching support, and meal planning. It will also showcase the Sculpted Vegan fitness wear, bikinis, and apparel.”

Another part of the app will be the Sculpted Vegan University, a platform for learning about bodybuilding and nutrition via online live lectures and recordings. “There is also a certification program in the pipeline where coaches will be able to get certified in the Sculpted Vegan training methods, so they can help other women build their dream bodies,” Constable says.

Keys to success

Ever since she was a little girl, Constable knew that one day she would be successful. She was determined and disciplined, and no stranger to taking care of others. “After my parents separated, my siblings and I were sent to a boarding school. I was always the organized one, the shoulder to cry on, despite being the youngest,” she says. “Now, I have a husband and four kids who are home-schooled. If I commit to training five days a week, I do it. If I say I’m going to make a million dollars from my business, I do it. There’s no room for excuses.”

Today, Constable uses the same strength, integrity, and compassion to help women sculpt incredible bodies. “My programs are hard and I am very upfront about that. I tell women not to buy my programs unless they are prepared to put in the hard yards,” she says. “Anyone can achieve anything they want, including an amazing body, but it requires work, consistency, and discipline. Those are the keys to success.”

Michelle has been a part of the journey ever since Bigtime Daily started. As a strong learner and passionate writer, she contributes her editing skills for the news agency. She also jots down intellectual pieces from categories such as science and health.

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Health

How to Help Your Child if You Think They Might Have Autism

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Do you suspect your child might have autism, but you’re not sure? While only a professional diagnosis can tell you for sure, there are many ways you can support your child while you get a diagnosis and create a plan. 

Here are some of the best ways to support a child you think might have autism. 

  1. Try a variety of therapies

While you’re in the process of getting a formal diagnosis, start trying different therapies with your child to see if anything resonates with your child. Every child with autism is different, so what works for one person may not work for another. There are several types of therapy you can try that are low-cost or free, including play therapy, speech therapy, floortime, ABA therapy, and more.

Although your child will need a formal Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis to get ABA therapy, it’s worth noting that once you have a diagnosis, you can get in-home therapy, which will make things easier on you and your child. Organizations like Golden Care Therapy in New Jersey will send an ABA therapist to your home to work with your child in their own environment. Getting in-home therapy will reduce the stress your child may feel from being in a new and unfamiliar place.

The more therapies you try, the better chance you have of getting a head start in supporting your child, whether or not they get diagnosed with autism. 

  1. Get your child some sensory toys

Kids with autism need to stim, which is just a fancy way of saying they need something to stimulate their senses in a way that allows them to mitigate and disburse the sensory overload they’re feeling. Without toys, kids will find ways to stim using just their bodies and their surroundings, but toys can be extremely helpful and less damaging depending on your child. 

Every child is different, so it might take a bit to find toys they like. However, you can find some excellent suggestions from The Aspie World on YouTube. Some toys spin, squish, make noise, or are a series of magnets that can be reshaped. If your child is already fixated on certain types of toys, try to find something that matches their existing interest. For example, if they like soft textures, find some plush toys with a velvety-smooth texture. Try all types of toys to see if they help your child.

  1. Seek a professional diagnosis

Getting a professional diagnosis is the best way you can support your child when you think they might have autism. Once you have a diagnosis, that opens the door to getting services that will help them immensely. Not just while they’re young, but it will help them in their adult life, too. For example, if your child moves out on their own, and they struggle with self-care and household chores, they’ll need a professional diagnosis to get in-home services from the state.

A professional diagnosis will tell you if your child is on the autism spectrum, or if they have a different disorder. Depending on the therapist you choose, they’ll likely be able to diagnose your child with any relevant comorbidities, which are common with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). 

  1. Learn about autism

Next to getting your child professionally diagnosed, learning about autism will help you support your child in many ways. There are many misconceptions about autism that can make it hard to spot the signs of autism. One of the best people to learn from is Tony Attwood. He’s considered the leading expert on Autism Spectrum Disorder and is extremely knowledgeable.

One of the most important things you can learn from Attwood is how to spot Autism in girls. For various reasons, it’s harder to spot autism in girls and some girls don’t get diagnosed until they’re in their 40s. Attwood gave an excellent talk about Asperger’s in girls back in 2015, and you’ll learn a lot from this speech.

Although Attwood’s speech focuses on Asperger’s, it is part of the autism spectrum. As a diagnosis, Asperger’s has been officially merged into the diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Support your child in every way you can

When you suspect your child might have autism, it’s important to support them in every way possible. While you’re seeking a professional diagnosis, start trying simple solutions, like play therapy and toys for stimming. See how they respond. Once you get a diagnosis, your child’s therapist will suggest next steps to help your child long-term.

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