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November is Diabetes Awareness Month – Three Simple Lifestyle Changes to Reverse Insulin Resistance

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Photo Credits: Istock

by Cellular Health Specialist, Dr. Bill Cole

If you or a loved one has type-2 diabetes, chances are pretty good you’ve heard the term “insulin resistance” bandied about from time-to-time. But this Diabetes Awareness Month, according to Dr. Bill Cole, founder of the Cellular Health Accelerator Program, it’s time to get educated on these phrases and how they tie into your cellular health – and how this knowledge can empower you to take control of your health and your body’s needs.

Insulin resistance – one of the hallmarks of type-2 diabetes – occurs when cells in your muscles, body fat, and liver start resisting or ignoring the signal that the insulin hormone is attempting to put out. As a result, your muscles and organs stop grabbing glucose, the body’s main source of fuel, out of the bloodstream and feeding into the cells.

Sounds grim, right? It doesn’t have to be. There are ways to retrain your cells to respond to insulin as they should – but it all begins with what you eat and how you live. Here are some simple lifestyle and diet changes you can implement to begin countering – and even reversing – the negative impacts insulin resistance can have on your body.

Negative Impacts of Insulin Resistance

While diets primarily consisting of carb-heavy, processed food are largely to blame for insulin resistance, toxins also play a big role. Researchers estimate that 30 percent of type-2 diabetics are suffering from the disease because of exposure to toxic chemicals: BPAs, insecticides, and pesticides chief among them. These toxins settle into our bodies and inflame our cells, leaving them too damaged to function the way they were designed to.

When cells stop responding to insulin as they should, bodies lose the ability to effectively use glucose. That glucose buildup in the blood leads to issues like obesity, high blood pressure, and cholesterol – which are often referred to as “metabolic syndrome.” This resistance isn’t unique to insulin as well; thyroid hormones can often cause similar symptoms for similar reasons.

The good news is that this resistance is treatable, often with diet and lifestyle changes. Reducing inflammation is key to restoring cell membrane health, and by doing this sooner rather than later, you can elevate your quality of life and ensure that these habits will help you manage your condition for years to come.

Cut Back

It’s a refrain you’ve probably heard countless times, but cutting back on sugars and refined carbs will go a long way in encouraging and maintaining cellular health. Processed food does a lot of harm to your body’s cellular function, and you’d be surprised at what switching to a nutrient-dense, whole food diet can do.

Additionally, be mindful of when you’re eating, in addition to what. Intermittent fasting – and fasting in general – has been found to increase the body’s sensitivity to insulin. Try restricting your eating to an eight-hour window as early in the day as you can, and try to avoid nighttime eating and snacking. As always, be sure to consult with healthcare professionals before making any diet changes.

Reduce Your Toxic Load

Remember all those toxins I discussed a while ago? They’re more prevalent in your everyday life than you might think. From beauty and cleaning products to water bottles and cookware, these toxins can leak into your food, drink, and skin faster and more often than you realize.

Invest in BPA-free cookware and food storage, and be sure not to store any hot foods in plastic containers. Same goes for microwaving; plastic can seep into your food if the food or the plastic gets hot, so if you want to microwave something, transfer it into a glass or microwave-safe ceramic bowl or plate before you do.

Water bottles are another common source of BPAs and other toxins. If you use a reusable water bottle, chances are pretty good you’re not cleaning it as often as you should. Mold can grow quickly on damp, dark surfaces, so be sure you’re handwashing your bottles frequently.

Also keep in mind that, while plastic and silicone water bottles are the most popular, they’re not the best for your health; stainless steel water bottles, while darker than their plastic counterparts, are a much better option when it comes to toxins. Plus, if you enjoy cold water, those stainless steel water bottles are better insulated than plastic. Just make sure you wash them frequently!

Stay Active, Always

Again, you’ve probably heard this many times before, but it bears repeating: Whether you’re focused on building muscle, toning up, or reducing fat, staying active every day is an important part of ensuring cellular health and rejuvenation. Exercising at least 30 minutes a day every day – or as much as your energy levels will allow – will go a long way in improving not just your cellular health, but your overall health from top to bottom.

Reversing insulin resistance can be as simple as making small, sustainable lifestyle changes that will drastically improve your physical health and overall wellbeing. This Diabetes Awareness Month, pay close attention to the areas of your life where you can invest in your cellular health. Your insulin levels, body, mind, and spirit will thank you!

About Dr. Bill Cole

Dr. Bill Cole, the founder of the largest functional medicine group of its kind, has created the Cellular Health Accelerator Program that helps people to be well, feel well, and age well. He has already helped to transform the lives of thousands and has spoken on stages across the nation. For more information, visit http://drbillcole.com

Michelle has been a part of the journey ever since Bigtime Daily started. As a strong learner and passionate writer, she contributes her editing skills for the news agency. She also jots down intellectual pieces from categories such as science and health.

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Health

Understanding The Relationship Between Diabetes And Fatigue

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Diabetes and fatigue have a direct relationship. If you have diabetes, you are likely to suffer from fatigue. However, do not mistake feeling tired with fatigue as those are very different from each other. When you are tired, you may feel energized after resting. But with fatigue, it is hard to get rid of feelings of exhaustion. 

Diabetes alone is a severe condition, and when fatigue is added, it can become stressful to manage both conditions simultaneously. But, fatigue should not be left untreated as it can affect your lifestyle significantly. Therefore, to treat fatigue in Lawrenceville, you need to understand its relationship with diabetes. 

Why does diabetes cause fatigue?

Diabetes is caused when the human body fails to produce sufficient insulin required to convert glucose into energy. If you are a diabetes patient, you are likely to experience fatigue at some point in your life. 

When a person consumes food, their body breaks down the food particles into simple sugars or glucose. Insulin is a peptide hormone that carries these sugars from your bloodstream to your cells and converts it into energy for immediate or later use. 

For people with diabetes, their body does not produce enough insulin for this process to take place. If your blood sugar level is high, these sugars will not be converted into energy and will build up in your bloodstream, posing severe health complications. One of these health complications is fatigue. 

Other causes of diabetes fatigue.

Changes in blood sugar levels may not be the only reason causing fatigue in your body. There are other factors related to diabetes that may be contributing to the condition. They are as follows. 

  • Frequent urination
  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Lack of physical activity 
  • Skipping meals 
  • Extreme hunger and excessive thirst
  • Blurred vision
  • Poor nutrition 

These symptoms may not cause your fatigue directly. However, all of these factors can cause mental and physical exhaustion, which may cause you to feel tired and unwell for a long time. Persistent feelings of tiredness can eventually lead to the development of fatigue. 

Your diabetes medications may be causing fatigue:

Various medications used by diabetes patients can have fatigue as a side effect. Following is a list of drugs that can potentially lead to feelings of fatigue. 

  • Statins
  • Corticosteroids
  • Diuretics
  • Beta blockers

Lifestyle changes are needed to manage your diabetes fatigue.

If you are looking to treat your fatigue using lifestyle changes, you need to take care of your diabetes. Diabetes and fatigue are correlated, and treating them can be successful when regarded as a whole rather than different conditions. 

The following lifestyle changes may be effective in managing your diabetes and fatigue altogether. 

  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Limiting stress
  • Getting exercise
  • Maintaining a healthy weight 
  • Practicing a good sleep routine
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