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People Can Now Buy Concert Tickets using Presale Passwords

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Presale passwords are used on Live Nation and Ticketmaster to permit spectators to purchase tickets for events before they are offered to most other people. Presale tickets are sold to members of the newsletter, members of the fanclubs and sometimes some other communities like users of Spotify.

Some presale passcodes are only be of use to people who have a specified credit card such as an American Express. In these cases, presale passwords will only work for folks having an Amex, so they can buy the seats.

CITI does a similar thing and issues charge cards that are usable in a presale to buy quantities of tickets when you’ve got the appropriate sort of credit card (ie one provided by CITI).

The whole point of presale is to get your hands on concert tickets. You need a password to purchase tickets during a presale. There are several terrific places to get hold of a passcode you want.

The top places we’ve uncovered up to now for presale passwords is Presale.Codes.

They have been publishing presale password details for a long time – offer a full money back guarantee and they are able to help you to purchase early tickets.

Occasionally ticket buyers ask questions like “Precisely how many tickets are in a presale?” or “Precisely how many tickets are left over for the public to buy when all the presales are concluded?”

Actually the industry doesn’t broadcast publicly exactly how many of the tickets are likely to be dispensed to CITI or American Express cardholders. After Twitter and Facebook campaigns cater for thousands, the venue e-newsletter swallows thousands more. Each band has got a fan club and those members get the best seats near the stage – if the band doesn’t sell them directly to ticket brokers for quick money.

After all this – there’s not much left.

As little as ten percent of tickets are sold to the general public for a concert.

How come there are so few tickets offered to the public?

According to our analysis there seem to be many aspects which have an impact on why event promoters allocate tickets in this way: Increasing their bottom line is unquestionably a driving factor. People need to earn cash, and promoters are not any exception.

Bands often scream “its all about the MUSIC” however you never hear them complaining when they’re on the road to jam-packed stadiums and multi-million pay outs.

These stories are very detailed about the underhanded activities of this industry. Without taking advantage of a presale to get concert tickets your odds are pretty slender.

The moral of the story: Public Sales are beaten hands down by Presales.

If you want to have the very best possibility of acquiring gig tickets, you should never hold out for the sale of public tickets. Get those tickets early on and be relieved that you’ve actually got a seat for the show. If you’d really like to put an even better strategy to work, you can invest in some tickets in the presale period, endeavor to acquire even more in the on-sale and IF you can sell the others, you will make a little profit yourself.

With the demand increasing and prices rocketing even higher you will be grateful to make it through the entrance of an event nowadays and if you’re able to subsidise the cost of your own tickets by just becoming a ticket reseller in your own right, hats off to you!

What number of tickets change hands during the pre-sales?

Justin Bieber and his promoter allotted ninety percent of tickets to fan club, pre-sales, specific credit card holders and insiders.

A recent New York Post article explained:

Devoted fans that were unable to see the sold-out July 2 One Direction concert at the Izod Center in New Jersey were very unhappy – actually shattered.

Before the concert tickets went on sale to the open public, merely a tiny fraction of the 13,687 seat tickets – only 4,474 (32%) were available for purchase by ordinary, everyday One Direction fans. The majority had already been set aside for presales, members of the band, insiders and fan club.

While fans are largely left uninformed with regards to ticket allocation (and it’s easy to see why), the vast majority of the tickets are allotted to record labels, the artists, talent agencies, fan clubs and tour sponsors, according to the Fan Freedom Project, a Washington DC based coalition supported by Stubhub.

No seat tickets at all left to buy for the ordinary fan during the public onsale.

In a case study in 2011, LCD Sound system went on tour. Now, when a band like this decides tour or stage a residency, a promoter like Bowery Presents or Live Nation manages them.

This promoter will help to determine precisely where they will hold gigs, and more interestingly, how concert tickets will be priced and distributed, quite often through holds (allotments) for music industry insiders and presale packages for credit card companies like CITI and American Express.

This is certainly where the vast majority of seats are secured, and generally only 46% of tickets are left over for for the public and fans.

A lot of folks can get extremely annoyed when they realize how few seats are left over for the wider public.

So, precisely what happens to the remaining presale concert tickets?

The venue ie Brooklyn Steel or Madison Square Garden or whatever, receives its cut of the fees added onto ticket sales, while the ticket vendors – Axa, Ticketmaster or Ticketfly – act as the primary market, making their money via service and convenience fees for some $25 billion per year.

Most of these principal ticketing merchants usually permit, and even urge, their purchasers to sell on seat tickets, on their own websites. Needless to say this means that the ticket company makes a profit when tickets are sold and a second time: when tickets are re-sold. Would that be double-dipping? Could be, it is dependent on who you ask.

It’s the insiders who cause most of the issues by securing piles of tickets below or at the face value but who then proceed to sell on those tickets on ticket websites like StubHub.

Good luck, and don’t forget, if you can, shop for your concert tickets early on using Presale.Codes.

Michelle has been a part of the journey ever since Bigtime Daily started. As a strong learner and passionate writer, she contributes her editing skills for the news agency. She also jots down intellectual pieces from categories such as science and health.

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How Conventional Scores Are Stopping Most Millennials From Accessing Credit and How One Company Is Changing That

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Credit scores are a barrier to entry for just about everything for millennials. Trust Science® is taking new metrics into account to expand access to credit with Credit Bureau 2.0®

What’s Keeping Millennials From Accessing Credit?

The concept behind a credit score seems simple enough. It tracks your credit history to see if you’re someone that a bank or lender can trust to pay back a loan. However, conventional credit scores just don’t account for the way that millennials and Gen Z handle their finances.

Even where a person would be fully capable and reliable in paying back a loan, the lack of an established credit score can prevent them from accessing credit, or at least from getting as much as they should be able to. That leaves millennials without an on-ramp into the modern economy and it can also jeopardize access to other “credit gated” necessities like housing.

The way that conventional credit scores are calculated is complex but boils down to 5 essential metrics:

  1. Payment history
  2. Amount owed
  3. Length of credit history
  4. Credit mix
  5. Hard credit inquiries

You can start to see the issue for millennials when you look at what data goes into their credit scores. For one thing, younger people don’t have a long credit history. Even without other factors, simply being young and only having had so much time to build credit puts them at a disadvantage. However, millennials have also been tending to establish credit later in life compared with previous generations, putting them at a further disadvantage.

The most significant issue here is the credit mix. Different types of credit affect credit scores differently, and millennials generally don’t have a favorable mix. While they might have a credit card or two, they generally don’t have mortgages. These are the most beneficial type of credit to have on your credit report, and millennials really have that going against them.

The student loan crisis also plays a big role. Young people today have much higher student loan debts than previous generations, meaning they have a great amount of credit owed. Not only that, but many can begin to fall behind on payments and see that amount grow. This can quickly send a credit score spiraling out of control.

Student loans aren’t the only threat. When young, some people make poor decisions. They could find themselves making credit mistakes very early on and suffering the fact that those mistakes can haunt their score for seven years in general. That means someone at 25 is still paying for a mistake made at the age of 18, even if they’ve been on the up and up ever since.

It’s clear that conventional credit scores weren’t designed with the current landscape in mind and that young people are being negatively affected. But what exactly can be done about this? One company is changing the way that lenders look at creditworthiness to make it possible for millennials to mitigate these issues.

How Credit Bureau 2.0 Fixes Those Problems

Trust Science is an innovative fintech company that has developed Credit Bureau 2.0, a scoring service that acts as an antidote for lenders, offsetting the problems posed by conventional credit scores. Instead of seeing a lack of credit history, a few negative issues from years ago, or a poor credit mix and ending any credit application, Credit Bureau 2.0 considers a wealth of additional data to generate a more accurate credit score.

Credit Bureau 2.0 expands the data used to calculate credit scores, getting the borrower’s consented, permissioned data and/or acquiring Alternative Data in order to reach a more accurate credit score. For example, those applying for credit can use Trust Science’s Smart Consent™ app to divulge their information safely and confidently to Trust Science, which is working on behalf of the lender that is trying to reach a decision about the borrower. By doing so, young people or other people without a credit history in-country can let prudent financial decisions in other areas of their lives demonstrate that they’re trustworthy for greater credit.

The service is available to a wide variety of lenders, including auto lenders, installment lenders, and single-repayment lenders. It’s in their best interest to find more reliable, deserving borrowers to give loans to, so Credit Bureau 2.0 benefits both sides of the transaction.

Trust Science CEO Evan Chrapko says that “Credit Bureau 2.0 isn’t just about giving borrowers access to more credit than they would have had otherwise. It’s about recontextualizing financial data to give both sides–lenders and borrowers–a more accurate and reliable way to enter into loans in the modern economy.”

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