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Seven Factors That Can Get Your DUI Dismissed

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It’s never a good idea to drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Everybody knows that. But you’ll still find people drinking and driving on a daily basis. This results in accidents, damage to property, and even gets people charged with a DUI. 

Unfortunately, some of these DUIs are unwarranted. Sometimes, it may only be a false positive on a breathalyzer test. If you happen to be falsely accused, a good defense attorney can help you get your DUI dismissed in court.

How to Get Your DUI Dismissed

No one wants a DUI conviction to be associated with their name, right? So you rake your mind trying to find ways to get out of it. But how can you go about this? This article explains numerous methods your attorney may use to get your DWI dismissed in court.

1. Blood Tests Or Breathalyzer Test Issues

There are no flawless tests, and when you have a DUI charge based only on a breathalyzer test, your DUI defense will usually be successful. For most policemen, if a breathalyzer confirms that you are under the influence, they will bring you to a precinct to get a blood sample drawn. If the blood tests are taken within three hours of the claimed incident, they are likely legitimate from a legal point of view.

Moreover, analysis of the sample by approved professionals is required. Otherwise, the evidence may be deemed unreliable and inadmissable.

2. Improper Grounds to Stop Your Vehicle

If the police have a reasonable suspicion that you’ve committed a traffic infraction, such as speeding or running a red light, they can stop you. In addition, if you’re driving recklessly and weaving in and out of traffic lanes, the DMV may suspend your license.

However, police have no jurisdiction to stop you if you follow the laws and drive with the traffic flow.

3. You Were Not Driving

In cases when the prosecution disputes that you were driving while intoxicated, police officers find it difficult to convince the jury. Even when they have substantial proof that you were drunk, there may be insufficient evidence to get a conviction.

4. Unlawful Acts of Search and Seizure

Without reasonable cause or until they acquire a warrant, police cannot inspect your car for evidence of liquor bottles or proof of drinking. Without a warrant, most officers cannot examine vehicles during a DUI arrest. So, whether there was probable cause to search the car becomes crucial. The Fourth Amendment’s privacy protections are violated when illegal searches and seizures occur.

5. You Didn’t Know the Drug Was in Your System

Even if you were not under the influence of drugs, someone might have drugged your food or drink and rendered you incapacitated while driving. You should not be convicted of driving under the influence as long as you can provide evidence to support this.

6. Inaccurate Field Sobriety Tests

Even the most reliable field sobriety tests cannot indicate whether a person is impaired by alcohol or drugs. Besides, there are only three tests with actual data to support their reliability. They only have the potential to detect impairment with a measly 65 to 77 percent chance of accuracy.

Poor results on field sobriety tests might also be attributed to innocent factors. This may include but is not limited to the following: intimidation, inadequate lighting, terrible weather conditions, unlevel surfaces, incorrect footwear, and more.

7. Entrapment

Your DUI charge can be dropped if you were entrapped. When you are coerced into something unlawful by an officer and arrested for it, it is known as entrapment. For example, if you are sleeping in your car while drunk and they force you to relocate the vehicle to leave a parking lot. However, before you can be released, you are arrested for driving under the influence.

Get Legal Help to Get Your DUI Dismissed

Warrantless arrests for DUI can lead to jail time, higher insurance rates, probable license suspension, and so on. Having a lawyer on your side may result in the charges being dropped instead.

Jenny is one of the oldest contributors of Bigtime Daily with a unique perspective of the world events. She aims to empower the readers with delivery of apt factual analysis of various news pieces from around the World.

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Director of Beirut Blast Documentary Reveals Untold Story: Artist and Filmmaker Fadia Ahmad Shares How Her Personal Life Has Shaped Her Work

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Photographer, artist, and filmmaker Fadia Ahmad is well known among the local Beirut art community, and increasingly so internationally, as her first ever documentary, “Beirut, the Aftermath” takes to festival screens around the world. In conjunction with her critically acclaimed series, “Beyrouth-Beirut”, the film continues Ahmad’s legacy for adeptly capturing the climate and ethos of a city on the edge.

Since returning to Lebanon, her home country, after a life spent exiled by civil war, the Lebanese artist has relentlessly pursued a higher understanding of identity, belonging, and now, justice. Often lacking from discussions of her work, however, are perspectives that question how her life and experiences as a daughter, wife, and mother have molded her voice and portfolio. I had the pleasure of asking Ahmad a number of questions regarding her personal life and how it has shaped her as an artist.

You grew up in Spain, what was that like for you? Did you feel as though you belonged there?

Yes, I grew up in Spain. I was born immediately before the start of the Lebanese Civil War on March 29, 1975. Little did I know back then that Spain would become my country of adoption. I really had a wonderful childhood. I was very blessed and I’m very grateful for what Spain gave me. As a child, it gave me security. It gave me an education. It gave me tolerance. It was a cosmopolitan place and I was raised seeing different kinds of cultures, different kinds of people. Something I’m truly grateful for is that I grew up in a Mediterranean country. Mediterranean people are warm, loving, friendly people. It was a beautiful way for me to grow up and learn from. In the beginning, I thought that Spain was my only country and that I must have been 100% Spanish. My parents, especially my mom, would remind me ‘you are Spanish at heart, yes, but you should never forget that you are also rooted elsewhere’.

Do you think that these lessons that you grew up with in Spain fostered something within yourself that was important to bring to Lebanon?

Yes. I think it’s important for each and every human being to know that we can learn from one another. What makes us evolve, what makes us grow, is our ability to adapt. When you get to learn about other cultures, other people, other ways of seeing life and looking at your own life, you realize that through this process you become a better human being. You have more tolerance. You are better able to accept the other. Your heart is more full and your mind is more complete.

Did you feel, growing up in Spain, that something was missing because of where you came from?

Because of my name, Fadia Ahmad, I was always asked ‘where do you come from?’. For me, not really knowing where my country of origin was, not knowing what my people looked like, it was very difficult to answer that question. I grew up not knowing where I was from. All I knew was that it was a country of war and conflict, but other than that I had no idea what Lebanon and what my people were like. It’s important for a person to understand things. Since ‘home’ was not something I understood, I had this sense that I was missing something from my life. I was eager and I was longing to understand where I come from.

How do you remember your return to Beirut?

My family was, of course, very happy that the war was over. I followed my parents’ decision to come back home. I was looking forward to it and I was so happy that after all these years I was going to see and witness this place that I come from. When I reached Lebanon I had such high expectations. In the first few years, I was incredibly disappointed. When you imagine something, it’s always better than the reality. You tend to make it more beautiful. It was like coming back to a fairytale that I had dreamed of and, we know of course, that it was anything but a fairytale.

You mentioned briefly your parents. How has your role as a daughter shaped you as a person and inspired you as an artist?

My parents were very inspirational to me. I’m a daughter in a very big family. We’re a family of nine children. So, the way my mother brought up this family, the best way she could, was by teaching us the values of love, tolerance, and understanding. She taught us strength by being out there alone, because at the time my dad was going back and forth to his work in Africa, so she had to do many of these things alone. She gave us love of the family, love of our country, she helped us understand why dad couldn’t be there all the time, that life was about sacrifice and sometimes people must struggle, that nothing happens overnight.

My father is a person I look up to more than anything in my life. He started from scratch, he couldn’t afford an education because he was brought up without means. He was born an orphan. He really impresses me in how he was able to become, from nothing, such a successful man, with all the struggles and ups and downs and foreign lands he had to go to. And he was always so down to earth, because he never forgot that he came from nothing.

Really he showed me that the impossible in life is possible, that whatever you dream of, you can make it happen if you truly believe that you can. This idea of making the impossible possible followed me throughout my childhood and throughout my adult life. If I’m where I am today it’s because of him and what he taught me. I really admire him a lot and I am proud to follow those same values that he taught me.

Of course as a child and later as an adult, when dad went through his ups and downs, I witnessed them. He showed us, as a matter of fact, that even when we have struggles and even when life puts us down so low that we don’t know if we’ll be able to stand up again, the strength to overcome really starts with believing. I was so honored to have been by his side through so many of these times.

How has becoming a wife and a mother changed your approach to art, photography and now film making with this documentary?

I have been very lucky and I am very grateful to God and to life for this. I am married to a wonderful man that I look up to. He happens to also be incredibly encouraging and always by my side regarding my career and hopes for the future. He has always pushed me forward and reminded me not to feel guilty for not being home all the time. This is something that I think is rare. Usually partners tend to feel as though they’ve been put in the backseat or neglected when one takes time to pursue their passions. He was never like this. He was always telling me that I should follow what I wanted to do, telling me how happy and proud he is of what I’ve become. He’s understanding and tolerant and lovely and he has been there for me since day one. More than a successful doctor, my husband is also an incredible father and a lover of art. I can’t overstate how much this last bit has helped us to grow and flourish together.

As a mother I replicate the values I had growing up. I try to show my kids that life isn’t always beautiful but no matter what we should face it and be grateful and understand that all the struggles we go through are lessons that we learn from. I’ve taught them altruism, I’ve taught them humility, tolerance, love, how to believe in and fight for their dreams. I’ve always respected their visions as human beings without enforcing too much direction.

It’s interesting, what you said about teaching your children that life isn’t always beautiful and that we have to face those moments and grow from them. Do you think that your role in teaching them this is something that’s filtered into your most recent film, “Beirut, the Aftermath”?

Yeah because whether we want it or not, our work reflects who we are as human beings. So throughout my entire artistic career my values have been there, you can feel them, you can sense them. Usually an emotion is something you feel. I’m so grateful for this gift to be able to make an emotion physical, to present it as something that you see and not only feel. All my art brings out an emotion, be it positive or negative.

To learn more about Fadia Ahmad, her work, and her most recent documentary, “Beirut, the Aftermath” visit https://www.fadiaahmad.com/.

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