Connect with us

Health

Study Suggests Maintaining Klotho Protein Levels Protects Against ALS-Related Nerve Degeneration

mm

Published

on

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gherig’s Disease after the famous baseball player who was forced to retire after experiencing the disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. The medical term for ALS accurately describes the effects the disease has on patients. Amyotrophic refers to three root terms: a meaning “no,” myo meaning “muscle,” and trophic meaning nourishment, all of which combine to indicate that the condition leads to no nourishment of muscle tissue and atrophy, or wasting away, of the affected tissue. Lateral indicates the upper and lower areas of the spinal cord that lead to muscle atrophy, and sclerosis refers to the hardening and scarring of the affected regions.

In ALS, motor neurons that provide an essential connection between the brain and spinal cord and the rest of the body degenerate or deteriorate rapidly. When the motor neurons eventually die, the brain can no longer cause or control muscle movement, leading to their eventual atrophy. Soon after, individuals can experience partial or total paralysis of voluntary muscles, leading to an inability to control muscle movement, speak, eat, and even breathe. The average life expectancy after receiving an ALS diagnosis is between three and five years.

Lack of Available Treatments

Currently, there is no cure for ALS. While familial, or inherited, ALS accounts for some cases of the disease, nearly 95% of cases occur sporadically, without any known genetic precursor. 

In an effort to find a potential preventive treatment for ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, researchers at Boston University’s School of Medicine have turned to study biological models that simulate neurodegenerative conditions. As a result, scientists have identified a certain protein that appears to serve a unique, beneficial purpose in protecting the brain from the mechanisms of ALS.

Klotho Protein

In Boston University’s School of Medicine laboratory model, researchers identified an anti-aging protein called klotho protein that showed neuroprotective effects. In fact, increasing klotho protein levels reduced neurological deficits in experimental models of both Alzheimer’s Disease and multiple sclerosis (MS). Researchers then posited that klotho protein increases may aid in protecting the brain against other neurodegenerative diseases, as well.

In a subsequent study on a laboratory model, klotho protein provided similar neuroprotective effects against ALS. Klotho protein was shown to reduce ALS-associated neurological deficits, thus providing a potential decrease in the manifestation of symptoms. In conjunction with the presence of anti-inflammatory brain cells called microglia, klotho protein shows potential to protect the brain against inflammation, degeneration, and motor neuron loss.

Future Implications

Klotho protein therapy, along with other activities that increase klotho levels, have been shown to potentially prolong the life of an ALS patient by as much as 300 days. Further, increasing klotho levels appears to improve quality of life by reducing ALS symptoms in patients who have already discovered the disease.

While the klotho protein has long shown benefits for other neurodegenerative diseases, this new information provides hope and potential therapeutic applications for the thousands of patients currently suffering from ALS.

Resources:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-06/buso-pop062719.php
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12031-019-01356-2

https://www.als.org/understanding-als/what-is-als 

Michelle has been a part of the journey ever since Bigtime Daily started. As a strong learner and passionate writer, she contributes her editing skills for the news agency. She also jots down intellectual pieces from categories such as science and health.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Health

Ellen Alexander: 3 Supplements to boost immunity you need to know about

mm

Published

on

Vitamin C, vitamin D, zinc – this is the golden triad we hear about pretty much every day as they are recommended both to boost immunity and reduce the severity of the symptoms in Covid patients. It’s pretty easy and straightforward to get in line with the recommendations. However, there are other supplements that are worth talking about during this troubled time. We just got to discover and read tons of studies about Bromelain, Quercetin, and Resveratrol. And they are all worthwhile if you want to boost immunity and even increase longevity. Let’s have a look at the details:

Bromelain

It’s extracted from pineapple but mostly from the stalk of the plant. The pineapple is a very popular tropical fruit that we can find nowadays pretty much everywhere in the world. The pineapple is rich in antioxidants, as well as fibers and enzymes that help digestion, reduce inflammation, and regulate intestinal transit. Pineapples are even recommended for people who want to lose weight because of their properties.

Bromelain is an enzyme extracted from the pineapple. It can ease digestion and help you get rid of inflammation, and these benefits have been clinically demonstrated. Bromelain can improve the amino acids absorption process, with a systemic impact in all metabolic processes where proteins are involved. Bromelain can help with muscle formation, joints recovery, skin cell renewals, and improve blood circulation. Studies show that taking bromelain supplements leads to an improvement in the skin aspect, mainly by reducing cellulite and swollen hands and feet. 

This enzyme can dissolve the internal scar tissue caused by inflammation in the body. Aside from calming the swollen area, it can also help the body recover after surgical interventions and other sickness. Studies also show that Bromelain can have a positive impact even on patients getting anti-cancer treatment. More than this, some research also demonstrated that Bromelain is antiviral and antibacterial, so it can be efficiently used to treat bronchitis and pneumonia and boost the immune system. And this makes it an ideal supplement for this period marked by the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Quercetin

This is a polyphenolic compound that can be found in nature in different fruit and vegetables. Quercetin is a bioflavonoid, a group of antioxidants that are also pigments. They fight free radicals and help the body on several levels. Among the effects of the quercetin, we’ll mention just a few:

– Anti-allergic effect;

– It can reduce the bad cholesterol in the blood;

– It can support the optimal function of the cardiovascular system;

– Anti-tumor action;

– Beneficial effects at the level of the eyes.

But we’re discussing quercetin now because it has been proven to have positive effects fighting Coronavirus. There are recent studies showing that quercetin can help keep the virus at bay. It has an inhibitory effect on this virus, acting against one of the key proteins that are essential for the virus multiplication. What happens is that quercetin blocks the enzymatic activity of the 3CLpro, hence having an inhibitory effect on the growth of the coronavirus, and can also lead to its destruction. 

Spinach, pears, red apples, kale, blueberries, onions, green chili pepper, and other fruits and veggies are good natural sources of quercetin. However, to make sure you get the daily recommended dose (500 to 1000 mg per day), you might want to get a quercetin supplement. 

Read full story on https://ellenlifestyle.com

Continue Reading

Trending